To join in on this discussion, you must first log in.

Discussion:Which client occupations drive you crazy?

From TaxAlmanac, A Free Online Resource for Tax Professionals
Note: You are using this website at your own risk, subject to our Disclaimer and Website Use and Contribution Terms.

From TaxAlmanac

Jump to: navigation, search

Discussion Forum Index --> General Chat --> Which client occupations drive you crazy?


Bengoshi (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
PVVCPA mentioned in another post that most of us are probably doing those darn difficult March returns now... which reminded me how much I dislike preparing returns for most realtors... in my limited experience, those realtors are the worst at recordkeeping (e.g., mileage records, don't maintain good records of entertainment -- just gives receipts for Starbucks, the karaoke bars), and are the least likely to pay their estimated taxes, etc (although I can understand the last one since their cash flow is irregular). Which client occupations do you all dread?

JR1 (talk|edits) said:

March 21, 2007
Engineers. They're just whacked.

Bell (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
I just posted a question concerning a realtor that I am working on. I have to agree. This return is an absolute pain in the neck. Expenses galore and I know nothing, including the mileage is documented. Estimates were paid, but irratically. By the way, do you enter the date paid which can and usually does cause a penalty when third quarter isn't paid till 4th quarter? I used to let the IRS catch this and bill for it. Just wondering what others do?

Chris2lane (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
I agree with JR. Engineers are so over the top organized. They have papers detailing info detailing backup info, etc. A lot of it is highlighted, then put onto spreadsheets, then paper clipped together. Enough already.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
Ministers, which require an entirely different mind-set.

Free-lance musicians not because they don't keep records, but because you might see 20-30 W-2s and 1099s and you have to allocate expenses between 2106 and C. Also they tend to work in multiple states, but don't make that much money. We just entered the data for one husband/wife musician couple where we counted 45 different sources of income, and then each added some teaching income from students, plus unemployment for often they work little in summar. Total income was less the 100K. Worse, she plays mostly in New York City and north of their home in NJ, while he plays in Philly, Maryland and the Jersey shore.

And let's not hear about their under the table income. Am Appeals officer, after we concluded an audit, commented that 'I did not go into her hidden income', to which I responded, "Oh yea, every wedding I go to I see somone playing a bassoon."

Pegoo (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
Pharmacists and Doctors with the "I'm always right" mentality. Although I love dealing with Nurses as they are open to discussion when you are doing their work. I find that I have to cite them to the exact line in the code reg to run it through the docs and then they complain about the extra billable 30 minutes.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
Any client under 35 that has started a business. They grew up in this "have it your way" generation, and they think everything is "optional"'; that or they can't make up their mind about anything.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
P.S. also, try a few interior designers to spice things up. Never again.

Daniteel (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
"Any client under 35 that has started a business. They grew up in this "have it your way" generation, and they think everything is "optional"'; that or they can't make up their mind about anything."

Hey!!! I am going to pretend I am offended. ;) Do I agree my generation is pretty spoiled? Some? Many? Yes. But, I grew up in a household with such quotables as "It's a cold world out there." (Followed by a knock on the window pane.) "Do I look like an ATM?" and "Nothing is free."

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
Heh, Daniteel, you are right. I think I just got a few bad apples this year.

Daniteel (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
My pet peeve is businesses where you know a lot of cash is flying under the table. I had a salon owner once tell me her total cash receipts for the year were $500.00. I asked her "Do I look like I just fell off the turnip truck?". Another cash based business's owner told me "I don't know what I made. Just make something that sounds good." When he refused to provide me bank statements or receipts I sent him on this way. There was no way I was signing that return.

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
Dani, that is a good one. Just had a client who said "gave $5,000 contributions to the church". Family of 4, wife doesn't work, and Schedule C (cash business) profit of $18,000. I said "I don't think so. Something is missing, like $30,000 of income."

Daniteel (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
Kevin,

LOL. Unfortunately, I am amazed at the number of preparers that accept the numbers without questioning them. The salon owner I sat down with showed a $25000 loss for the business, but then I looked at her personal records she purchased $14000 in new stocks. I asked her if she loaned the company money for the year? No. Did you take any payroll or draws? No. The company is broke. Do you have a rich, generous boyfriend? No. I am single. Did you receive an inheritance? No. Then where did the $14K come from? She looked a little worried now. I pointed out if I notice these discrepancies do you think the IRS and the state are not going to notice?

Why do people think they can get away with this?

Dsglouise (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
Guys, I have a lot of fun here. I thought that there is something wrong with me, while having the same situations as written on this almanac. Now, I see that nothing is wrong with me, and I’m not alone in my “battle” with clients. I just do not have enough confidence, and you give me a lot of it.

I thank you for this.

Sandysea (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
My most irritable clients are the "artist/designer" ones. They are not organized; they are "creative" so I spend alot of time trying to uncreate??? what they created...a mess...then they are the ones that think my job is easy...they CREATE!!! hehe

Peteo2662 (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
The most difficult client's return I do is a Professional Golfer. But he gets the info to me early and does not expect the work to turn around the next day and most importantly he is NOT fee sensitive. But as a group I hate dealing with lawyers. They are certain that they know the law and believe almost every scheme invented to avoid taxes. They tend to try to hide money from spouses (especially if they practice family law). And finally they are horrified if you operate under the same billing practices they do on a daily basis.

Actionbsns (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
CONTRACTORS!!!! Without a doubt contractors are my least favorite. They are always sure that you can tweak their return any way you want, they never have records, there is always hidden money somewhere, they are generally a nightmare. Except one, and he and his wife (an interior designer) are my favorite clients.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
I have a couple tax preparer friends who do nothing but contractors, but NOT me. For some reason with these people, I always get the feeling that they are treating me like a "sub" on a construction project, i.e. my job's not over until they try to talk my bill down as much as they can. Forget it.

Dsglouise (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
I think that contractors are not that bad, even though they never keep their records. I found them very friendly people, and they love me, trust me, and tip me. I treat them as my family, and receive cards from them on holidays and their family events. But engineers and programmers are worse for me. They are always suspicious. They drive me nuts with millions of questions, trying to figure out how to prepare return without my help the next year. They think that there is nothing to do in their return, and take twice as much time as everybody else. They are too cheap, always shop around. Well, I’m a computer programmer myself, and I behaved the same way some time ago. Guilty as charged.

Bonnie (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
I just fired a real estate agent. She's trying to tell me she spent 150.00 week for meals and entertainment. Hardly any income of course. The CPA of twelve years allowed it! Since she was already an NOL I left it on the return. Dumb! The IRS says they're auditing thousands of real estate professionals this year. I can't afford a 1000 fine for fraudulent return or loose my business. She swears she has the correct receipts. She's mad I won't prepare her return this year. Now---She also bought a third business. Three office in homes in the same house! Another house sits empty for the last three years in a resort area? Help! I don't want to go to jail!

JR1 (talk|edits) said:

March 21, 2007
My #1 Rule: Stay out of jail so that I can spend clients' money.
  1. 2: Keep clients out of jail so that they can send more money.

PVVCPA (talk|edits) said:

March 21, 2007
This is not really an occupation, but I don't like the clients where one spouse (usually the wife) put's together all the information, and the other spouse (usually the husband) does nothing to prepare for the appt, but constantly heckles her because she forgot 1 or 2 things.

Moneric (talk|edits) said:

21 March 2007
all of them & they get worse closer to 4/15

Fondawise (talk|edits) said:

22 March 2007
Any person who wants to justify to me why they don't want to claim income. This usually happens with self employment and occupations that receive tips. They think that their sob stories are going to change the rules or my mind. Today I had a client who is refusing to pay the tax on an amendment I did for him for free. I had found a mistake, grrrr, and corrected it. He owes money, but thinks that since IRS hasn't "caught" it he will let it go. On the otherhand I LOVE ministers and love the specialness of their returns.

Klesher (talk|edits) said:

22 March 2007
The returns that bug me the most - those darn K-1's from PTP Partnernships. Client usually has pidley amounts invested anyway! Generates lots of forms and hardly any tax benefits!

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

22 March 2007
I forgot about them; I spent 35 minutes Sunday entering 13 or 14 of them. I charge one person $25 a K-1; she had 34 that year and what frosted me was that perhaps 10 in her name were duplicated by 10 in joint name, but often with different numbers. She'd inherited hers and bought more with other money in joint name. Raised the question: can you offset a gain in ABC PTP in your name with a loss from ABC PTP in joint name.

Of course Proseries also drives you nuts by calling it an error if you enter items on Line 1 and 2 on the same worksheet, which means if there is a profit on Line 1 and loss on Line 2, and you follow their error message, you pay tax on the profit but the loss is suspended by the software which is too dumb to realize it is the same ID #.

Klesher (talk|edits) said:

22 March 2007
LOL Yup DT - I use Pro Series also- and I hate entering on 2 different lines. Good question on the joint name vs single name - I would almost venture to guess " yes"

Taocpa (talk|edits) said:

22 March 2007
My priest clients drive me crazy. They are really honest, but they think that Mass stipends are offset by their charitable contributions as they give most of the money away. Of course they give it to the people on the street, friends, parishioners in need, etc. When I tell them that's not the way it works, they get hit over the head with a sledgehammer by virtue of paying so much in SE tax.

It kills me to tell them and some take it well, others don't.

Bushmaster (talk|edits) said:

22 March 2007
Anyone who says anyting other than a Preacher hasn't done a Preacher's return!!

Rules I go by: 1. Get paid. 2. Don't get sued or go to jail (or do anything to cause either). 3. Keep cient out of jail. 4. Keep client happy.

Sandysea (talk|edits) said:

22 March 2007
Some clients you can't keep out of jail no matter how hard you try...hehehe.

Laticiaw (talk|edits) said:

22 March 2007
The ones who can't keep a checking account because they think as long as they have checks, they have money...

Dsglouise (talk|edits) said:

22 March 2007
I have a client who uses his check book wisely, but never gives checks out. Instead he pays cash, the amount that is on a check, and thinks that if he wrote a check, it’s enough. He just gives me his checkbook with 100s of written and signed checks, and tells me to calculate them, and take them into consideration as his expenses.

What would you do?

Deback (talk|edits) said:

March 22, 2007
The governor of Michigan, Jennifer Granholm, is starting to get on my nerves. She or someone in the Michigan Department of Treasury has recently started cracking down on homestead property tax credits when the taxpayers sold a house and didn't report any gain on the sale on Form MI-1040CR (even when there is no gain and a note was attached to the efiled return stating there was a loss or the home was sold in 2007). The State of MI is now requiring copies of the closing statements when the house was bought and when it was sold, a list of improvements, and copies of the receipts for major improvements--even when there is a loss on the sale of the home--and when the home was sold in 2007, I'm having to fill out a special new form the State has created and is sending to people with this situation. I've had two or three like this so far this year.

And the continuing problem with the State of Michigan denying property tax credit claims when the form was prepared correctly with the correct amount of property tax bills and taxable values. About two or three times each tax season, I'll have to do amended returns, even though the returns were prepared correctly. They are now stating the denials are final determinations, and I'm having to type a letter and send it to the Conference Request Division, instead of simply filing an amended return to point out the State's error. For years, their system has been matching the taxable value and the amount of property taxes listed on the form with the jurisdictions' millage rates. I've had two or three of these so far this year.

Acctax (talk|edits) said:

22 March 2007
I have been pondering this one for days & have decided the clients that you completely informed regarding what kind of "books" they need to keep for a corporation and all the do's & don't's and in the middle of February they bring in notebook sheets of paper with their figures....(I know what I would like to do with those sheets) and then expect a proper tax return by 3/15. Hmmm....what word come to mind.....EXTENSION.

Dar

Klesher (talk|edits) said:

23 March 2007
I have had it with these da... PTP K-1's. Another client that has tons of these stupid things, Magellan, Energy Transfer, Atlas Pipeline etc. Am I missing the boat here? Are these super investments??? It seems like this year I have seen an influx of these K-1's

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

23 March 2007
They are good investments: most pay nice distributions for little taxable income, plus they trade and have been very strong. My broker client who makes 1.5M was the first to get into them. I had to give him a course on gain and loss on selling.

Klesher (talk|edits) said:

23 March 2007
DT- I see where they get pretty good distributions , with very little taxable income. I have seen alot of these years ago, then it seemed people sold them , now they are getting back in. But I still hate them - was up at 5:00 am this morning working on one and lo and behold working on another one now at 8:00. I am getting kind of punchy here !

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

23 March 2007
Discussion:Voiding stale dated payroll checks, punch, cookies, Jim Jones, china, coffee, and cat food

Klesher (talk|edits) said:

23 March 2007
thanks Kevin - is it too early to be punchy!!

Dsglouise (talk|edits) said:

12 April 2007
I’ve got a new client - a layer’s wife. She calls her husband ‘X’, thought asked me to prepare joint. She warned me that her X is a lawyer; therefore everything has to be done properly according to the law. I warned her also that I’m not CPA... but CPA charged her $600, and I - $150. So she closed her eyes on this fact.

The numbers came out terrible. They’ve got to pay more than $20K. I spoke to her on a phone, and she yelled at me, “No! I don’t except YOUR tax return. I’ll go to somebody else.” “All right.” I said, “You can try, though it’s hard to find somebody at this time of the year, and it’s not going to help you anyway. You’ve got to pay what you’ve got to pay. Your X made 100K more than previous year, and claimed 4 exemptions having just 1. What do you expect?” Then she came to me with her ”X” and they showed me a nasty scene of a couple getting through divorce. Thanks God, I’ve never been there in my life. They asked me to recalculate their return for separate and then ordered me to file an extension. I refused, and they left. She called me again, ordering me mail her join return. I”ll probably refuse her next year, if she comes to me with the same attitude. Never had a layer as a client before.

Donnafoleytx (talk|edits) said:

12 April 2007
Contractors are the worse. Usually someone has told them to set up a corporation. Of course, they keep no books (use their checkbook for their books, which is comingled and unreconciled), have employees who are not on payroll, have not sent 1099's, have not paid estimated taxes, only want to count the income if they received a 1099, and did not even know they needed to file a tax return for their corporation. I stay away from them.

Eastendcpa (talk|edits) said:

12 April 2007
My least favorite client type are Doctors who have as much investment account activity as a day trader and have alot of option trading. Gives me trouble every time.

Donnafoleytx (talk|edits) said:

12 April 2007
so they are day trading while we sit and wait in the exam rooms dressed in those little gowns ...

PVVCPA (talk|edits) said:

April 12, 2007
My new most-hated clients are those that attend seminars that cost more than $5,000 (usually $10K to $15K, even saw $30K this year) and also pay a business coach 20x more than they would ever want to pay me for way better business advice.

Donnafoleytx (talk|edits) said:

12 April 2007
I think most of my clients pay their housekeepers and lawn services way more in one year than they would ever consider paying me - no wonder their books are a mess

PVVCPA (talk|edits) said:

April 12, 2007
The best part about the stupid seminars that these people are going to is that I deduct them as Sch A 2% Investment Expenses and AMT is taking it all away.

"My business coach said the seminar and his services are all deductible."

Sure, no problem, look at it right there on the Sch A. You should pay him more next year, and get a better deduction. Hell! We can write off the finance charges on your maxed out credit cards, too, because all those charges are going to these scam artists.

Idiots!

Everyone's looking for the quick buck. Nobody wants to work anymore.

Where's my gun?

Wwtaxes (talk|edits) said:

12 April 2007
So I'm not the only one getting surly this week ...

Laticiaw (talk|edits) said:

12 April 2007
Nope -- Hubby is getting surly as well because I'm not doing anything around the house...just at work all the time...

Deback (talk|edits) said:

April 12, 2007
I just shampooed my office carpet. Didn't get the bathroom, waiting room, or steps done yet, but I was tired of just sitting here waiting for people to pick up. Only had five drop-offs today and they were quick. And got my own efiled today. Can't wait for these last 23 to pick up tomorrow and Saturday, plus probably a few more drop-offs tomorrow. I'm ready for some freedom!

Wwtaxes (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
Alright, now you're just getting plain cruel!

Aren't there any obscure questions out here that you can pretend to be busy with? I'm sure if I looked in my archives, I've probably got a dozen or so that never got answered. Maybe I should title a discussion "Questions for almanacers who have time on their hands".

Doug Phillips (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
People who raise horses.

PVVCPA (talk|edits) said:

April 13, 2007
Doug, Excellent point. I am surprised the IRS does not audit every single tax return that contains the word "Horse" somewhere on it.

Except the farriers, they can leave those people alone. Besides they stink really bad, so the IRS probably would prefer to leave them be.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
People who invest in Energy PTPs. I can understand my broker client, who actually knows a little about their taxation, but when clients walk in with 15-20 K-1s, I want to send them out the door to let their broker do the return. And then there is my South Philly insurance/investment advisor, who has his real estate in MMLLCs taxed as S corps on his choice,with his 22 PTPs, none with an investment of more than $3,000. I counted 34 pages for his Federal return, all to get down to the zero. Very interesting, his only tax was wiped out by an energy credit but he also has unused Foreigh credits, unused LIHCs that he earned himself on some of his slum housing and other goodies. To make matters worse, he lives in PA but has a house in NJ, two actually counting where his wife lives, and files as an NJ resident but must pay PA on the real estate.

Bottom Line (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
Yard guys - I think the sun cooks their brains.

Wwtaxes (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
PVV - here's one right up there with those coaches:

Just did my nephew's taxes. A couple years ago, one of his friends had a girlfriend that was a mortgage broker. She talked him into some snazzy new product that would lower his payment for him since his roommate had just moved out. Turned out to be an interest-only ARM, with a pre-payment penalty. He's just trying to hold on until he can refi again. Just did his taxes, He made $25K less this year than last (sales), Paid $4K more in interest than last year, but the real kick in the teeth was that the principal on his mortgage went up over $1500. I'd like to give his dad a kick in the pants for letting him do something so stupid, and I'd like to get my hands on that broker.

Bottom Line (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
I think we're going to be hearing more and more of this.

Wkstaxprep (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
attorneys and financial advisors have caused me lots of aggravation :)

PVVCPA (talk|edits) said:

April 13, 2007
Off topic, sort of:

Does anybody know about these "Accelerator" loans? My client that spent $10K going to get-rich-quick seminars and $5K on a business coach refi'd into an "Acclerator" loan. Apparently, this loan is linked to her checking account. It sweeps the balance in the checking account each day, and serves as overdraft protection when she writes checks against the checking account.

I just know she's gonna get herself in trouble. Current balance $230K. This thing has a limit of $510K! She thinks it's a great deal because it will save bundles of mortgage interest over time. I can't wait to remind her every year what her principal balance used to be.

Hellothere (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
PVVCPA, I have had clients asking me about these loans. Don't know anything about them, but there is a seminar coming up that I will attend. It does sound too good to be true, thus my urge to investigate.

Wwtaxes (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
I've done some serious research into these, and am very tempted to refi to one myself. They are not new, they're just new to the US. It's the way Europe has been doing mortgages for years. It works much as you describe, and bc of that, it's best disciplined clients who have a positive cash flow. For those of us who keep a sizeable rainy-day fund, it's even better bc that continually drives down the interest. On the down side, they have high closing costs, so you need to stay in the house for a while, and they're best for people who seriously intend to pay off their mortgage. There is an online calculator, but I can't find the URL at the moment.

For those of us who don't have consistent income (my depends on my contracts), it allows you to throw the windfalls against your mortgage, even though it may be temporary. However, you still need positive cash flow, even in the off years.

It will only be good for your client if she is disciplined about making her payments, and has a positive cash flow.

Wwtaxes (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
Here's the URL:

www.cmghome.com

I don't really like online tools like this because as one of those whacked engineers (thanks JR), I always want to know what's going on behind the scenes. We happen to have office space in a friend's mortgage office, so at the beginning of the season, while I was waiting for all the procrasinators, one of the brokers and I spent quite a bit of time looking for catches. I told my nephew who has a year to go before he can refi, to do as much research as he can on it, and to try to find references of folks that have these.

PVVCPA (talk|edits) said:

April 13, 2007
85% of my clients would have this thing maxed out within 3 years. It's too dangerous for everyone. It's like Murphy's Law says. The only people that would benefit from this don't need it.

Wwtaxes (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
I absolutely agree, and the broker I was talking with will only do them for certain clients. The problem is that there are too many brokers who will sell them unscrupulously. However, I'm sure you also know people that would greatly benefit from this if it turns out to be for real. I don't agree with your last statement though. I'd like to put my rainy day money to better use. The idea is that the money you deposit the first of the month will work for you until you spend it. So as you pay your bills throughout the month, you will only be paying part of the month's interest as opposed to paying the the entire month's interest. That's vastly different than paying extra principal payments, which you can never change your mind about.

Bottom Line (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
Most of my clients would also max this thing out. Their credit cards are maxed and they don't understand that their house is not an ATM machine. When I tell them that the only debt I have is my house (no car, no credit cards), they look at me like I'm from another planet.

Wwtaxes (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
I have plenty of those too. But maybe it's just my family and friends mostly, but there are also a lot of us much like you. We all only have a mortgage. And most of my nieces and nephews are the same way. I wouldn't even mention this to most of our clients, but I definitely have some that can benefit - IF it turns out to be as advertised, which I'm not convinced of at all. Just bc it's patterned after Europe doesn't mean that someone here didn't decide to put all kinds of nasties in it.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
I'm with PVVCPA: we are not "sexy" enough for them to throw their money away on, but they will sit open-mouthed at some seminar, listening to the simpleton exaggerations of some bullsh*t artist, and pay handsomely for the privilege. Go figure. It's a rare client that realizes that real tax planning does not occur when you sit down to do the return! P.S. don't even get me started with the money clients spend on spas, quacks, and other alternative therapies: it's all deductible, right? SURE, and your nails look great by the way.

Bottom Line (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
"But the expert said it was deductible"

Bengoshi (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
Crow & BL, I couldn't have said it any better. Certain clients just fall for these slick talkers and believe everything they say. They end up going to these seminars where they teach you how to "creatively finance" the acquisition of real estate and generate "passive income." They spend literally $30,000 on these courses and we take the heat when we're unwilling to deduct these expenses.

I kind of like reading this guy's website, evaluating various real estate gurus. Don't know whether this author is legit himself b/c he also sells real estate investing materials, but he seems pretty straightforward. http://www.johntreed.com/Reedgururating.html

Birdman (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
any person who has never worked and suddenly trys to start a business. You can explain the concept of income and deductions 5 times every tax season and they never get it.

and then they buy quickbooks to solve their problem.

Wwtaxes (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
Birdman,

you forgot step 3 - they incorporate to protect themselves.

Bottom Line (talk|edits) said:

13 April 2007
Bengoshi - great link. I'm going to bookmark it.

Shaunna (talk|edits) said:

14 April 2007
My gosh this is hillariously funny to read!! Great for a quick break! Mine would be the clients that are just plain cheap! They want to expense everything and "oh, don't worry I will be able to back that up..." I have a client for whom I do the accounting only for that very reason!! Others don't want to take the time to do their busines correctly - ie. starting a bed and breakfast in the home and deciding that they don't want to put ANY of the fixed assets (beds, chairs, tables, etc) in the return but the put all the improvements in. I don't get it..... Then there are the individuals who make over $100k and say "my last preparer only charged me X" when X does not correspond to your own simple return fee. Oh well, somehow I love this stuff anyway:)

Natalie (talk|edits) said:

January 14, 2008
Paul, et al, what was the result of your clients who did choose to go the mortgage accelerator route? I have a client that is considering one of these equity lines to pay off their current mortgage ($260k) plus some other bills. My concern is the $100,000 limit for deductibility of the interest.

Natalie (talk|edits) said:

January 15, 2008
No need to reply to this discussion. I started a new one.

To join in on this discussion, you must first log in.
Personal tools