Discussion:State tax research resources

From TaxAlmanac, A Free Online Resource for Tax Professionals
Note: You are using this website at your own risk, subject to our Disclaimer and Website Use and Contribution Terms.

From TaxAlmanac

Jump to: navigation, search

Discussion Forum Index --> Business Growth Community --> State tax research resources


KatieJ (talk|edits) said:

24 March 2008
An unsigned question on my user page asked what state tax research resources I use. I have access to a 50-state subscription to RIA Checkpoint because I teach at San Diego State University. Even the fairly large and successful local firm I work with can't afford that. I also have access to Lexis/Nexis Academic, which has some deficiencies (Shepards only for U.S. Supreme Court cases, for example), but does give me State Tax Notes and access to many journal articles, as well as cases. This is why I am willing to provide detailed citations to statutes, regulations, cases, etc. that I know others probably can't easily find. If you know the code or reg section number or the name and court involved in the case, you can usually find it on a state web site or in Findlaw. It's hard to find anything in the public places if you don't have a citation.

State revenue department web sites are a useful resource that is available to everyone. If you go to the Federation of Tax Administrators web site, http://www.taxadmin.org, you will find links to all of the state tax departments. Some sites are better than others, but they have improved dramatically over the past few years. You can almost always access all forms, often in fill-in form, all statutes and regulations, and many cases and rulings.

Some state tax resources, including the Uniform Division of Income for Tax Purposes Act (UDITPA), the MTC apportionment regulations, P.L. 86-272 and the MTC statement interpreting it, etc. are available on the Multistate Tax Commission web site, http://www.mtc.gov.

There are links to many state tax sources at http://www.taxsites.com/state.html.

If you ever feel an uncontrollable urge to read Quill or Container, there is a handy page at the UC Davis Institute that provides direct links to many important U.S. Supreme Court decisions on state and local tax issues in Findlaw: http://www.summertax.org/u-s-supreme-court-cases.

Belle (talk|edits) said:

March 24, 2008
Only one of the reasons we are so glad to have you around!

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

24 March 2008
The unsigned was me, I thought I put it right, but I didn't. I would be interested outside of tax season to know your opinion on how long this can last under the current fee structure. It seems to me this is a extremely underpaid profession. I have no idea how I can do a Will without hardly thinking at $300, and yet a tax pro at $250 is to do a 1040, itemized, with Scd D problems (much less E, C) and state problems/issues for $250, can someone explain that?

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

25 March 2008
By the way, thank you!

JR1 (talk|edits) said:

March 25, 2008
For less money, and lesser souls who don't try to compete with Katie...there are two decent sources that I know of. First is thru Kleinrock's service, if you like them. I don't, no cites, but the state info is decent. AND, ADP if you have a relationship with a rep has a place on their site that you can access and get good info. Nothing like a real service, of course, just more than the internet for cheap. Or free.

Wwtaxes (talk|edits) said:

25 March 2008
KatieJ - you can see who made the entry by looking at the history tab of your home page. It will show the edit and who made it.

CrowJD - I have found state issues to be a real holdup this year. IMHO, it could be one of the biggest strengths of this forum - to talk to others who know a given state well. As Kevin so often points out, the software is not always dependable. Prior to this year, you had to made explicit additions to the MN return that the software should have handled (ProSeries now handles this), but there are other idiosyncrasies. I'd be happy to help with MN/WI questions, and I've gotten some great feedback from others on PA, OH, and ND.

Taxstudent (talk|edits) said:

25 March 2008
I'd try CCH Essentials. I have the RIA 50-state at work, but it could be better. I've never really looked at state tax resources, so I don't know what's out there.

Taxwizard (talk|edits) said:

25 March 2008
I have been using the CCH 50-state reporter for about 3-years. I spend the cost of a new car each year when I renew. Not sure that CCH is as good as it once was (change in ownership).

Previously, I used RIA’s 50-state reporter and BNA’s state tax service. I also have Westlaw for areas that CCH doesn't cover. I have heard good things about Kleinrock. How does it compare to CCH or RIA?

KatieJ (talk|edits) said:

26 March 2008
It's just as well I didn't know how to identify the questioner, since posting the answer has generated more useful conversation here.

I swore by CCH for many years until I retired from a firm that used it and had to rely on the University's RIA. A former colleague now with a Big 4 firm kindly lets me use his CCH ID and password on occasion, which I do only to help students who have CCH access at work learn to navigate it. In recent years I don't see much to choose between CCH and RIA -- it's more a matter of what you are familiar with. Everything seems to be there in both places if you can just figure out how to find it <G>.

I've never used Kleinrock, although I did have temporary access to it a couple of years ago when I was teaching tax research at SDSU. I have the impression that it isn't as complete as RIA and CCH (and that it's considerably less expensive), but that may or may not be the case.

Taxstudent (talk|edits) said:

26 March 2008
Last I checked, Kleinrock's cases only go back to the 1950s, which is not very useful compared to CCH and RIA. Having researched topics to death, I've found coverage gaps in both RIA and CCH. I'm not talking about 1970s memos from the Legislation and Interpretation division, I'm talking about actual cases that are missing, or, in RIA's case, treasury decisions that link to a subsequently published correction (stating that the original is missing two commas) and the actual document is not available. BTW, CCH is better for those 1970s memos. Personally, I'd use the new Lexis solution if I was on my own.

To join in on this discussion, you must first log in.
Personal tools