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Discussion:Quickbooks disk

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Jokadah (talk|edits) said:

18 April 2006
I have a new client and the previous accountant will not supply him with a backup copy of his Quickbooks. Previous accountant stated that the Quickbooks was his and that the client did not pay for the program. He can use what ever program he chooses to reconcile their bank accounts. Consequently he does not have to supply them with a copy of Quickbooks. He did give them a copy of the general ledger, P&L and balance sheet. He said that he also used Lacerte to prepare their taxes and would not give them a back up of that either. Supplied them with a copy of their tax return and says it is the same thing. Is he correct? I can start doing his accounting based on the info I have, just wondering what the rest of you do. I told him that I don't know if he legally has to give him a back up copy since he did not pay for the program.

HPTAX (talk|edits) said:

18 April 2006
The program(s) belong to the accountant. He gave you what you need to start.

Natalie (talk|edits) said:

18 April 2006
Is that really all someone needs? What about a list of outstanding bank items? Open invoices? Open bills? Even if QBs was used for a cash-basis client, at the very least the last bank reconciliation should be provided as well. Is the prior accountant a CPA? If so, there are ethics rules that would need to be followed in this situation. If I were the successor accountant, I would be concerned about why the prior accountant seems to be unwilling to provide additional copies.

HPTAX (talk|edits) said:

18 April 2006
(Deep cleansing breaths...) You're right, it'd be nice to have the bank recs. I thought we were talking taxes not bookkeeping. Sorry. The client should be in possesion of his/her own records.

Sandysea (talk|edits) said:

18 April 2006
Natalie; If the prior accountant is not providing these, perhaps there is an outstanding invoice or some other reason for not releasing all the information. Not that it is right, but sometimes people hold things "hostage". If you have the g/l and the b/s, then you will see old outstanding items on the g/l from the bank rec. These will show as uncleared on the quickbooks g/l. As well, the A/R and A/P will show open items. You may need to reenter them if you are using quickbooks, but they are in the G/L at the period in question.

Hope this helps clarify.

JR1 (talk|edits) said:

18 April 2006
Let's assume that the accountant was merely using it for his own write up work. He owes the client nothing but the paperwork, but I'd say the bank rec ought to be included.

Dennis (talk|edits) said:

19 April 2006
and depreciation schedule. Asking for the Lacerte file seems a bit outrageous. Remember we are talking about an accountant who gave client a complete general ledger.

Jdugancpa (talk|edits) said:

19 April 2006
While I agree the QB backup is not part of the basic accounting records, I would make sure that the accountant does provide a copy of the QB general ledger which IS a part of the basic accounting records. If the client is fully paid-up with the prior accountant, there really is no reason for the accountant not to provide the backup, since that is the simplest way of insurning that the client has everything that he needs. While the client may not have paid for the QB, the data and the program are two separate things. The data really does constitute the basic accounting records of the company. Now as to the Lacerte file, I don't feel the same way. That is definitely the accountants, not the clients. But of the depreciation records were done on Lacerte, the accountant owes hard copies to the client, because, again, they constitute part of the basic records.

Jokadah (talk|edits) said:

19 April 2006
Thanks for all of the input. The new client does not owe any money so this is not a "hostage" situation. Client relocated so to my knowledge no bad blood between the two. Printed copy of the GL was provided as was balance sheet and P&L. He was not a CPA. Maybe this is just his policy, would have made my job easier but if he's not legally obligated to provide back up on disk so be it. Depreciation schedules were attached to the copy tax return.

Natalie (talk|edits) said:

19 April 2006
Sandy, yes, I realize that some accountants withhold client records because of outstanding invoices. For CPAs, that is an act "discreditable to the profession" in violation of Ethics rule 501.01 and is also in violation of many state statutes. Since the prior accountant is not a CPA, however, that is not an issue here.


As far as the G/L showing cleared items, that column may or may not have been printed. I know when I print reports from QBs, that's one of the first columns I delete so I can fit other things on the page.


J - I think I would call the prior accountant and attempt to get the other schedules. You might get some additional information about issues that came up in the relationship with the client, etc.

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