Discussion:Niaspan

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Solomon (talk|edits) said:

22 November 2011
Whoa!

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

22 November 2011
That's an interesting study.

I wonder if they tested Niaspan or Niacin? I'd need to know the exact chemical makeup of Niaspan.

If the RX Niaspan is made to be nonflushing (Niacinamide and derivatives), then the problem could be right there.

They have known from some time that non-flushing Niacin (i.e. Niacinamide) is a waste of money and can harm the liver.

Thanks for letting us know about the New England Journal of Medicine article.

_________________________

If anyone has been told to take Niacin (or a so-called RX form of Niacin) it could be because of high triglycerides. A lot of times these folks will be carb. cravers.

See if your doctor can estimate your VLDL: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/vldl-cholesterol/AN01335

The best cure for high triglycerides is a high protein diet along the lines of Atkins. It's also an excellent diet for diabetics. The problem is that it's not an easy diet to stay on.


They are finding more and more that fats are not the problem in heart disease at least for a lot of people. It's the carbohydrates and particularly the carbohydrates with a high glycemic index.

Mikec61 (talk|edits) said:

22 November 2011
I heard of this study about seven months ago. I have been on 1000mg of prescription Niaspan for more then 5 years. After hearing about the study I asked my cardiologist if I should discontinue its use. He gave me the OK. This was in April. I recently had a fasting blood done and here are the results. Triglyceride 81 HDL 50 VLDL 16 LDL 103. I went back to last years blood work and looked at the results. Triglyceride 72 HDL 51 VLDL 14 LDL 95. As you can see the HDL did not seem to to effected by the fact that I have been off Niaspan for almost seven months. It seems that the discontinuance of the Niaspan made no difference. Plus, it is a relatively expensive drug.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

22 November 2011
Now that I read the article over again, it does appear that they tested B3 (pure Niacin) and not Niaspan.

They gave the B3 in a time released dose.

This could also be a problem. This is why medical research is so complicated. It could be that taking B3 in an immediate release version might be effective. (Even though immediate release would probably increase the stroke risk relatively more than extended release).

They'll wade through it sooner or later.


(P.S. Regarding Niaspan: Remember, Niaspan was able to obtain a patent for a reason. The reason would be that it reduced the side effects of Niacin(B3) and was safer for then liver than non flushing Niacinamide. Niacin (B3) and Niacinamide are both available over the counter. Don't assume that Niaspan acts exactly like B3. It may or it may not.).

Solomon (talk|edits) said:

22 November 2011
Mikec61:

Consider getting the Berkeley Heart Lab Test. Best lipid test I have ever had which included several other items pertinent to the heart.

BTW, Lipitor is going generic the first of next month. Obviously, I am going back to that and drop Crestor.

Mikec61 (talk|edits) said:

23 November 2011
Hi Solomon:

Just a little background on my medical history. In Feb 2001 I had a major heart attack. This after running 10 marathons and countless 1/2 marathon and 10k's. Also was playing competitive ice hockey at the time. Luck for me that I live just outside of Boston and my wife is a nurse. Got me from a local hospital to Beth Isreal in Boston and they were able to put in four stents. Spent one week in hospital due to low ejection factor. Took me 5 month to get back. Still run two days a week (only 4 miles) and am back playing competitive hockey at age 72. My cardiologist thinks I am his star patient. I guess the moral of the story is that one needs to keep active. Re: medication, I do take 40mg of simvastin. seems to work for me. MikeC

Solomon (talk|edits) said:

23 November 2011
"My cardiologist thinks I am his star patient. "

Wow! I think so too.

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