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Discussion:Enrolled Agent CPE - Specific Question about CPE

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Discussion Forum Index --> Business Growth Community --> Enrolled Agent CPE - Specific Question about CPE


Gmikeg (talk|edits) said:

29 January 2006
Hi,

Do any EA's out there know that if I take CPE prior to admission to practice before the IRS (Form 23 in process), will the CPE be accepted as if I were already an EA?

Thanks,

Mike

Mstax (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2006
I didn't think so.

Lalva (talk|edits) said:

4 March 2006
I am going to start preparing for the EA exam.

Does anyone have any suggestions about how to study, if it's better self-study, online or class? For those that pass the test successfully, which books did you use?

Tctaxserv (talk|edits) said:

4 March 2006
Lalva,

I used the Gleim EA Test Prep Software.

It's basically a test taking study course and work great for me. I passed all parts the first time.

Martineo (talk|edits) said:

4 March 2006
A good method- and free:

Old exams- Study prior years questions and answers. You can find that on line

Taxea (talk|edits) said:

5 March 2006
Martineo is right study the old tests. Mark the questions you got wrong and retake the tests concentrating on those questions until you fully understand them.

I took a prep course and found that being in the classroom was very helpful if I needed to have anything explained in more detail in order to understand it. Also be sure you know the different formulas for determining how to figure the taxable amount of any item. You will not be allowed any notes, calculator, etc during the test. They hand out scratch paper and pencils. Nothing is allowed in the classroom that might aid you in the test.

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

6 March 2007
Studying the old exams is no longer enough to prepare you for the exam. You must study ALL of the items on the list provided when you sign up with Thomson to take the computer based exam.

Dsglouise (talk|edits) said:

6 March 2007
can you give me the link tho these old exams?

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

6 March 2007
Here are the topics

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

6 March 2007
here are the 2007 instructions

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

6 March 2007
Some FAQs about the new test (As an aside, I was one of the 7 EA Subject Matter Experts participating in the Cut Score Study mentioned, to determine the minimum requirements for a candidate to pass. There were also 2 IRS Subject Matter Experts. We were not given 3.5 hours to take each part of the exam, because we were supposed to already know this stuff.)

Dsglouise (talk|edits) said:

6 March 2007
Thanks, guys, appreciate it.

Pink Pearl (talk|edits) said:

6 November 2008
Based upon three parts to the EA exam would it be wise to try to pass the "most difficult" portion of the test (as perceived by the test taker) first if more than one session taking is preferred?

Candidates who do not pass a part of the exam after four attempts during the May 1 through February 28 test window must wait until the next testing period before attempting the part again. Candidates have a two year window from the time they pass the first part to pass the other two parts of the exam.

Just for fun I took the 2005 exam this week and reviewed the answers when done but probably needed quite a bit of review on part 2. Or does it really matter which order other than mentally getting the most challenging over first?

Mscash (talk|edits) said:

6 November 2008
The operative word is "continuing." If you are not an EA (or CPA or other kind of licensee) you do not "continue" your education until your basic education is done.

Pink Pearl (talk|edits) said:

6 November 2008
Umm...perhaps I was not clear on my question (sorry)..If a non-enrolled preparer wishes to take the SEE test in three different sessions should that person try and pass the most difficult portion (for him) first to get it out of the way or does it matter. Or does one have to take part 1, then part 2 and part 3 in that order? Thank you

Kinson (talk|edits) said:

7 November 2008
PP that would be completely up to the individual test taker. I personally took the tests 1, 3, then 2. I did this because I wanted a little bit longer to study for the 2nd part. You do not have to go in order. I just passed the final part today, actually. Hurray for me! For those interested I used Phoenix Tax Group's study guides.

Philia2 (talk|edits) said:

8 November 2008
PP, I wanted to take part III first as I thought that was the easiest one, but I ended up passing part I, part II, part III in that order (because that's how I received my study books). No matter how you decide to take the SEE you'll need to do a lot of study. I used Thomas Tax study books, but I do NOT recommend them.

Philia2 (talk|edits) said:

8 November 2008
Good job Kinson by the way! I passed the last two parts 9-10 days ago.

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

8 November 2008
Congrats to all passers, be sure to join the National Association of Enrolled Agents and your state society!!!

Uncle Sam (talk|edits) said:

8 November 2008
Just to clarify - when you join NAEA, you are automatically (unless you specify otherwise due to geographic constraints) paying dues to join the state society as well.

Scow (talk|edits) said:

8 November 2008
Gleim EA Test Prep

How detail is each topic being present? Is that like a college textbook or it only give you an oultline of each topic?

Philia2 (talk|edits) said:

9 November 2008
Hi Scow. You can try Gleim for free here: http://www.gleim.com/accounting/ea/

Donniecastleman (talk|edits) said:

10 November 2008
I passed the first time all parts with Lambers EA review taught by my friend Arthur Reed, it definitely worked out for me and Mr. Reed is very easy to follow and you will gain at least twice as much information as you need to pass the exam, then when you get the certification I'd go to CPE Depot to keep your credits up to date on a year by year basis, they give you full access to hundreds of CPE credits dealing with all aspects of taxation, it's $129 a year and worth every penny in my book. Anyway, just letting you know what worked for me on the test and what is working for me on CPE credits, hope that helps!

Fa740 (talk|edits) said:

10 November 2008
Any CPE's earned before you are actually enrolled will not be counted by IRS. You have to earn your CPE's after enrollment

Wkstaxprep (talk|edits) said:

11 November 2008
try to pass all the parts on your first try and then see how you do, chances are(based on your effort) you will pass all parts the first time, or just have one or two parts max left to complete the following year.

plus, if it's still only once a year, why would you want to drag it out?

NMexEA (talk|edits) said:

12 November 2008
I also used, and recommend, Phoenix Tax materials.

Wks, the exam is no longer offered only once a year (thank god). You can attempt any Part at any time during a given test cycle, which extends from May through the following February. If you fail a Part, you don't need to wait a year to try again.

So there's no reason to attempt all three Parts at once. Plus, each attempt at each Part now costs just a bit less than $100.

A passing score is valid for two years. Once you pass all three Parts, you have a year to apply for enrollment though I can't imagine anyone delaying amy longer than the time it takes to fill out Form 23 and drop it in the mail!

NMexEA (talk|edits) said:

12 November 2008
Oh, and I agree strongly with Kevinh5; EAs should join the NAEA. The EA Journal alone is worth the dues.

Delia123nyc (talk|edits) said:

27 May 2009
I just take the part 3 and failed, my question is: in the same test cycle, is the retake test same as the previous test version? thanks,

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

27 May 2009
What did you study, Delia? Or rather, what materials did you use to study?

To answer your question, each test pulls from a pool of questions, so the questions you get the next day are not likely to be the same questions as the day before. WARNING: some questions MAY look the same and be on the same topic, but they are worded differently.

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

27 May 2009
The reason I asked is because part 3 is the shortest part of the SEE, and has a very short list of publications and instructions from which the questions were pulled. Most people find that there is so little to study, either you know the material or you don't. That being said, I do believe that this part of the exam is important for a new EA to know, because it focuses on practice and procedure, including representation. Without knowing that material, one is just a tax preparer.

Riki EA (talk|edits) said:

27 May 2009
A recommended book for studying for Part 3:

"Tax Procedure and Tax Fraud" by Camilla Watson. I used this book and the Gleim materials and passed Part 3 on first try in February 2008. Hope this helps! -Riki

Delia123nyc (talk|edits) said:

28 May 2009
Thanks everybody about the suggestions,

I'm studying the Arthur EA Review course book, I used it for the first 2 parts and passed both on the first tries, Curiously enough, for part 3 I felt I was fully prepared but failed, however the first 2 parts I did not think I would pass but I did.

Radevarum ka (talk|edits) said:

31 May 2012
Hi there,

I need your advice... I've got my EA card in Dec 2011. I see that the card is dated: Dec, 23rd 2011. I don't understand did I have to take any CPE classes in December???? I received the card end of the month. So far I haven't taken any classes and I don't understand when My EA year starts? Is it Jan 2012, so I need to have 72 hours for 3 years, 16 hours min per year correct??? I am super confused... Thanks a lot...

Okie1tax (talk|edits) said:

31 May 2012
When does your card expire, 2013 or 2014?

CT Pelican (talk|edits) said:

8 June 2012
Radevarum: Here is my best understanding, incorporating the new annual license renewals:

1) You must 24 hours per year, for each full calendar year you carry the license. 2) If licensed for part of a year, you must do 2 hours a month the license is active.

Presuming your license expires on 03/31/2013 (as mine does, renewed in January 2012), I would figure on the following:

  - 2 hours from Dec. 2011;  24 hours for 2012;   6 hours for the first three months of 2013 (just to be safe).

Total: 32 hours. And remember - within that total you must hit 2 hours of tax ethics CPE in each calendar year. For you, likely 2 of 26 for 2011+2012. please check the IRS EA pages - this is all laid out in considerable detail, and I may not have it right.

A couple of sources for CPE: - IRS Webinars - some are good, some meh, but they are free. Worth say 4 to 6 hours a year.

 - IRS local liaison meetings - held intermittently, often with local groups like the CPA association.

- Join the NAEA, get their bi-monthly magazine and take the tests online. Worth 2 to 4 hours per issue.

  - Very detailed on very specific topics, and quite useful. Pricing is very appealing, convenience is great.

- Join your state / local EA association, if any. They can offer CPE as part of meetings. Cost is good, quality can be ok to not so. - Go to the national EA convention held by the NAEA in Las Vegas in August. That'll get you up to 24 hours in 3 days. - Fill out with special topics of interest from any of the myriad vendors providing CPE. Believe me, they will find you and mail you notices.

I ignored CPE for the first year, a big mistake that required a crash catchup. Now I am ever alert for CPE opportunities, what ere the source. In time I will likely become more discriminating, as I get a better sense for the wheat vs. chaff ratios from various providers. Good luck!

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