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Discussion:Deadhead Miles - Over the Road Truckers

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Discussion Forum Index --> Tax Questions --> Deadhead Miles - Over the Road Truckers


Klesher (talk|edits) said:

2 April 2007

Have various truckers - one was audited before I started preparing his taxes. The auditor allowed deadhead miles - at the business mileage rate. I have since also taken them, but have wondered why - since the truck is already depreciated and he is expensing all his costs - when he sells the semi - any ramifications since the basis will be zero with additional mileage being taken.

Okie1tax (talk|edits) said:

2 April 2007
I would like to know how he claims actual expenses AND mileage.

Wwtaxes (talk|edits) said:

2 April 2007
Shoot, I'd just like to know what deadhead miles are!

Deback (talk|edits) said:

April 2, 2007
Don't know what deadhead miles is (is that when truckers drive up those ramps to slow them down when they are driving too fast?), but if the truck is fully depreciated, you can only deduct actual expenses and not both actual and mileage.

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

2 April 2007
WWW, Deadhead miles are those driven while listening to Jerry Garcia.

Klesher (talk|edits) said:

2 April 2007
The dead head miles are when the truckers have runs that they are not carrying anything.

So they are running but not generating revenue. I actually have the audit report from the auditor, allowing the mileage rate AND the depreciation of the tractor. the auditor redid the tax return and entered a line item on his Sch C as deadhead miles, miles x rate and deducted it.

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

2 April 2007
The auditor is ignorant.

Deback (talk|edits) said:

April 2, 2007
Sounds like that auditor didn't know what he was doing.

Bottom Line (talk|edits) said:

2 April 2007
Deadhead miles are when the truck is empty. You take a load from FL to Atlanta. Unload the truck in Atlanta then drive empty to Nashville to pick up another load to take to Chicago. The miles from Atlanta to Nashville are deadhead miles. Truckers get paid less for those. (And people say you don't learn things by doing taxes for a living!)

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

2 April 2007
but they've got to listen to Jerry Garcia.

Klesher (talk|edits) said:

2 April 2007
Kevin - I agree with you, but as along as as I have the audit report - and my client wants to take it - well, I will.

Deback (talk|edits) said:

April 2, 2007
Klesher - So does that mean you don't agree with me and you only agree with Kevin?

AHH (talk|edits) said:

2 April 2007
Kevin, wouldn't this one be a Image:oink.jpg situation?

Deadhead miles=trucker (meaning he's driving a tractor/trailer big rig-not his pickup truck) hauls a load from point A to point B, has nothing to load and bring back to point A, therefore deadheading. HOW can he be deducting miles when he's depr. tractor/truck and expensing all other costs of operating that truck? I want the name and phone # of that IRS agent!!

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

2 April 2007
maybe the auditor is a follower of Jerry Garcia

Klesher (talk|edits) said:

2 April 2007
Oh Deb - sorry I missed your entry - guess I read too fast - my eyes are really burning.

Klesher (talk|edits) said:

2 April 2007
I would not have believed it either if I did not get all the paperwork from this guy!

Okie1tax (talk|edits) said:

2 April 2007
How do I direct my brother-in-law's return to this auditor? I am sure I can come up with a few more items for him.

Acctax (talk|edits) said:

2 April 2007
It goes to show you that even IRS auditors don't know everything even though they think they do. It is crazy that the auditor took deadhead miles and deprec./actual expenses. I would never, ever deduct any mileage on a OTR client's rig.

Personally, I would not deduct them for any years following the audited year. Next auditor might be a lot smarter. Keep that can of worms closed.

Dar

AHH (talk|edits) said:

2 April 2007
I agree w/ Acctax. Don't go there.


Tonymontana (talk|edits) said:

7 February 2013

Acctax: I would never, ever deduct any mileage on a OTR client's rig.

Can you elaborate on that comment. Are you saying you would never deduct mileage and actual at the same time or that you always take actual. I have a client who's mileage beats actual by just a few dollars.

Belle (talk|edits) said:

February 8, 2013
Just an FYI, Tony - this thread is six years old.

Tonymontana (talk|edits) said:

8 February 2013
Was perusing through old threads cause I had nothing to do, and thought this would be a good one to bring back from the dead.

Did I just commit a big no no?

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

8 February 2013
Listening to the Greatful Dead while driving? I am so disappointed that this isn't what this discussion is about.

Tonymontana (talk|edits) said:

8 February 2013
Well if it will make you feel any better. I like to read dead threads while listening to the Grateful Dead.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

8 February 2013
You know the way these guys are, Tony......had you raised a new question on deadheads, they would have told you to search the yellow box......it is T/A's version of 'can't win.'

Tonymontana (talk|edits) said:

8 February 2013
LOL. Yep. I hear'ya D&T. Just can't win.

Belle (talk|edits) said:

February 8, 2013
Did I just commit a big no no?

Nope, I just didn't want you to sit around waiting for six more years for an answer <w>.

EZTAX (talk|edits) said:

8 February 2013
Listening to Jerry play "trucking"

Taxea (talk|edits) said:

9 February 2013
Maybe the auditor is the one listening to Jerry. I agree that mileage and expenses can't both be taken but, if taking mileage as a Sch C driver, the deadhead mileage is taken both ways because the travel rules allow round-trip mileage...doesn't matter if the truck is empty on the return trip.

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