Discussion:Clinging to God, Guns and Gold

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Discussion Forum Index --> General Chat --> Clinging to God, Guns and Gold


MP-JD-LLM (talk|edits) said:

17 November 2012
They are clinging to their God, guns, and gold. Obama said it, not I. However, in that vein, I tried out a few sidearms today.

Ruger SR9c, Wow. 9 mm of course. It is light, smooth with a short crisp trigger break. Easy to punch the center out of the target at 10 yards. It weighs only 23.4 oz. Recoil is not bad and easy to hold on the target for a surprize break. I was impressed. I like the Springfield .40 XD, but what good is a weapon that is too bulky to carry under your shirt or jacket. OK, the .40 is a tolerable winter gun, but where do you hide that bulk in the summer?

Ruger LC9, forget it. It feels surprisingly nice when you pick it up. It is small, compact and light. It fits in the front pocket, even of jeans. However, I have no idea where my rounds were going. None of them were hitting the paper. The problem with the LC9 is that it has a long, heavy trigger pull. It is a double action semi-auto and does not revert to single action after the first round. By the time the trigger breaks, I am a mile off target. What good is a weapon if you can't hit anything?

Kel Tec PF9, same as the LC9. It conceals nicely, but you would never want to pull it out, unless you are hoping that the report gives your attacker a heart attack.

Ruger SR22. Ever shoot an Smith & Wesson 22A? It is simple, inexpensive, long, and very accurate. You can break clays on the ground at 50 yards, with this little .22 cal. Well, the SR22 is not quite as accurate, but it only weighs 16 oz and is easy to holster in the waistband. It is more accurate than the SR9c. I would almost prefer it. However, a .22 LR, even with high velocity mini-mag hollow points may not have the stopping power you want when you need it.

Then, there was the Sig Sauer Mosquito. Everything about the operation of this little beauty is smooth. The safety, the slide release, the trigger, the mag release all work with no effort. However, it is just a little too big and a bit too heavy, as compared to the SR22, or the SR9c. I may as well be carrying my .40, and the Springfield has infinitely more stopping power than the mosquito. The Springfield could easily bring down one of the big black bears that come up on my porch looking for snacks, but who would ever want to shoot a bear? They are enormously better than the human species.

I have some loose Benjamins, and I am in the market for something small, light, concealable, and, especially, accurate. Does anyone have any suggestion other than the models that I tried out today? Nothing bigger than a 9mm or .380 ACP.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

17 November 2012
It's small, light, concealable and especially accurate.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

17 November 2012
The best commodity play right now is to buy a rental, keeping in mind that a house is nothing but collection of commodities plus labor. So it's by far the cheapest way to play commodities right now if you can find a decent rental to purchase.

Gold is still doing well, but never forget one thing. Gold is the sworn enemy of the world's central bankers. As soon as the world gets a little better on it's financial feet, the central banks will work in concert to destroy the price of gold, and they are very good at it.

I've actually watched the central bankers do this exact thing in the past.

I would guess that sometime in the next 5 years, the central banks will get together and put gold under attack, stay tuned and be careful. Hogs get fed, pigs get slaughtered.

22's are great for target practice and the ammo is cheap, but that's about it.

I'm always looking for a concrete post to stand behind myself, either that or I'll try to stand behind my dear wife when the bullets start flying. I'm a big believer in cover when the Elephants go on the rampage.

Fr. Mackelhenry (talk|edits) said:

17 November 2012
Agree with you Crow, people must be disciplined and know when to take profits on gold.


I think scientists have made estimates of the number of people buried under European soil. I can't remember the exact number, but it's mega-huge. A good number of them were sent to their graves for the sake of God, Guns and Gold.

One a somewhat related topic, here is another (2003) story from Europe. Bodies are refusing to decompose in coffins even after 30 years and scientists cannot figure out why.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/germany/1446872/Dust-to-dust-but-not-if-your-dearly-departed-is-buried-in-Germany.html

PollyAdler (talk|edits) said:

17 November 2012
Agree with Crow, why pay a "premium" price for gold in the market when you can buy commodities at a discount in the way of a rental house? I can be even sweeter if it is a rental with positive cash flow.

So I'm just making a suggestion. If you believe inflation is going to be a problem, look for ways to buy commodities today at a discount. A house is nothing but a pile of commodities plus labor.

If you'll notice, thieves take advantage of vacant foreclosures for their commodity value alone.

I still think we have an oversupply in real estate (hence the discount), but if you could find the right property in the right market, it's a great commodity play.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

17 November 2012
One last warning on gold: never buy physical gold or silver.

The vast majority of people hold on to their metals too long, and they inevitably sell at a loss. Don't compound this loss by having to pay the obscene commissions required to sell physical gold or silver.

Always, always investigate the sell side of any investment before you investigate the buy side.

Generally the same idiots who unwisely rush to buy physical are the same idiots standing on line in a rush to sell.

So if you must buy gold, please don't buy physical gold or silver. It's strictly for rubes no matter what promises have been made to you.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

17 November 2012
Excellent advice, CrowJD.

Hammock (talk|edits) said:

17 November 2012
Back to the original,post, except for your weight criterion, I'd recommend Sig P239 in 9mm, if you can find one used that is.

EasternPA (talk|edits) said:

17 November 2012
>> One last warning on gold: never buy physical gold or silver.

Alas, there's the flip side: The guy who is supposed to be holding your physical gold could have:

1. a golden pyramid scheme going,

2. just found out a fire destroyed his vaults and the gold flowed into a 2 mile deep crevasse,

3. been betting against you and did not buy the gold when you asked him to, since he was sure that he'd be able to buy it cheaper manaƱa.

EasternPA (talk|edits) said:

17 November 2012
For the sake of accuracy, the Obama quote is:

You go into these small towns in Pennsylvania and, like a lot of small towns in the Midwest, the jobs have been gone now for 25 years and nothing's replaced them. And they fell through the Clinton administration, and the Bush administration, and each successive administration has said that somehow these communities are gonna regenerate and they have not.

And it's not surprising then they get bitter, they cling to guns or religion or antipathy toward people who aren't like them or anti-immigrant sentiment or anti-trade sentiment as a way to explain their frustrations.

Alas, no gold in the quote.

Gazoo (talk|edits) said:

17 November 2012
Thank you, Podolin.

Hammock: I'd recommend Sig P239 in 9mm, if you can find one used that is.

It's a nice gun to have, and you'll need it to protect your gold. So make sure to calculate that expense into your ROI calculations on your gold. lol.

EasternPA: just found out a fire destroyed his vaults and the gold flowed into a 2 mile deep crevasse,

So, so true. They are really pushing physical metals in conservative talk radio advertising now. That will give you some idea of the morals of the conservative radio entertainers. I would refuse to accept such ads if I had a radio or TV show.

One place you can make money on physical metals is a place like India. They have a very, very long history with it. The reason their system works so well is that they have a ton of dealers in precious metals, and hence this drastically reduces the transaction costs for the customer. The Indian women wear the family gold around their necks.

Also, every Frenchman keeps a few gold roosters under his mattress. I think it's more for luck than anything, or maybe for the proverbial rainy day.

MP-JD-LLM (talk|edits) said:

17 November 2012
I have to admit to a certain sense of perverse mischief here. I often travel to New York for business. I find that if I want to shut a conversation down, all I need to do is describe the pleasure of sending 180 grains 300 yards down range into a metal silhouette. I had the feeling that at first mention of a warm gun, all four dissociative personalities (you know who you are) would come out with their non sequiturs blazing. What fun on a rainy Saturday morning.

Hammock, if I weren't married, I would consider a second mortgage to to buy the Sig P239. Wow, $850. I have only fired two Sigs, the mosquito and the 1911 .45. Both outstanding weapons.

PollyAdler (talk|edits) said:

17 November 2012
Hold on, I grew up down South and I really am an honorary Southern Colonel, appointed by Gov. Joe Frank Harris of my state, for life I assume. Even though I am one of the more liberal Southern Colonels around and I'm not too good at frying chicken, nevertheless I can shoot a gun well.

I don't like to hunt not because I feel sorry for the animals so much, but because I'm afraid of the other humans in the woods. My father dropped a loaded rifle on me twice from atop a deer stand. He fell asleep each time from an excess of revelry the night before. I am not kidding.

I retaliated each time by urinating on the ground all around the deer stand, and sending all the deer over to the next county.

Yes, I know how to tote a gun. And I'll say it again: I prefer cover. I'll take a portly wife over a powerful gun any day.

Let this be a warning to all you secessionists out there. As a Colonel, I am technically subject to being called up to serve if necessary, and I am determined to head up the PSYOPs operation for my state if I am called to duty.

If our governor were to say, "Put that nut Crow over PSYOPS.", that would be music to my ears. I'd be as happy as Br'er Rabbit in the briar patch.

PollyAdler (talk|edits) said:

17 November 2012
While I'm at it, I can't resist plugging a book. On the Plantation: A Story of a Georgia Boy's Adventures During the War (1892) by Joel Chandler Harris.

The best memoir of the Civil War written by anybody on either side of the war. Harris spent the war living on a plantation as a printers assistant. The plantation owner also owned a newspaper. Harris was very young.

So he covers small town life and plantation life during the war.

I can't emphasize what a great book this is for the truth. American history is a lot richer and a lot more saucy than what most of us have been led to believe.

In one scene, young Joel is sitting on a fence watching our defeated boys march past him on the way home. The young Joel was not so much in awe, but scared to death because of the continuing catcalls of the men who thought him very pretty (these men having been deprived of all release for some time). Of course the soldiers were half kidding him, but it rings as true as a bell.

For those who do enjoy hunting and stories of hunting, Harris describes the adventures of the other young boys, some of the slaves and himself as they romped through the woods looking for small game to shoot for the table. This is the real McCoy. Fantastic stuff. Let's just say that children were not babied in those years, they were allowed to live and have adventures of their own.

If America wants to produce great literature again, then it must have children who are allowed to live great lives.

MP-JD-LLM (talk|edits) said:

17 November 2012
Polly, it's not that I don't believe you, but a Sourthern Colonel would not call a rifle or sidearm a gun. It fact, there was a very humiliating punishment for marines who made that mistake.

By the way, did all four of you grow up in the south or did you sometimes wake up in the north and wonder how you got there. I find your condition fascinating. It a nice diversion from writing a memo on the tax implications of distributions of capital from a usufruct.

NMexEA (talk|edits) said:

18 November 2012
Yet the magazine is called "Guns and Ammo".

I spent my toddler and grade school years next to a woods. Not a park, mind you, but a couple dozen acres of wild second growth. When we moved (I was in Junior High) Dad made sure to buy a house next to another woods. Oh, man, let me tell you. My parents didn't trouble to watch me unless I was late for dinner. I didn't hunt though almost all of my friends did. I tried fishing with Dad on occasion, streams, rivers and occasionally on the salt chuck but Dad never caught anything so neither did I.

I drive through housing developments now and wonder what the kids do with their afternoons. Sigh.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

18 November 2012
This is your rifle, this is your gun

One is for shooting, the other's for fun

PollyAdler (talk|edits) said:

18 November 2012
"but a Sourthern Colonel would not call a rifle or sidearm a gun. It fact, there was a very humiliating punishment for marines who made that mistake."

I can assure you that the one qualification that a genuine, honorary Southern Colonel does NOT have to have is military experience. Some honorary colonels have been in the military, but I'd say the vast number of us have not.

I'd say that by and large we are a crowd of (vastly out of shape) gentlemen who know a politician for one reason or other, or our families knew one when we were younger.

The man that kills you is a good shot or a lucky shot, no matter what he calls his equipment.

We'll probably have to get Spell Czech in here to resolve this. Spell is it ok to call a rifle, a pistol, a revolver and a shotgun, or even my new Elephant gun, just a gun, or not? Leave off whether it's good form, just tell us if it's ok or not.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

18 November 2012
Tell us how you earned this august honor, Polly.

PollyAdler (talk|edits) said:

18 November 2012
I will.

I was sitting in my modest apartment as a young professional when one day I got a cardboard cylinder from the state capitol in the mail which contained a fancy parchment.

To my shock and awe, I was informed by that parchment that I had been appointed Colonel of my state, or words to that effect, accompanied by a good deal of curlicues and other embellishments, and the same stuffed to the gills with words no longer in common use, and then signed by our governor.

My roommate whom I knew from high school was immediately impressed, but I was less so. For one thing, even at that young age, I realized this had nothing to do with anything I had done with my life.

I also learned that my brother in law, who comes from the most blue blooded of the blue bloods down here, also got a similar honor on the same day as I did. My dear brother in law, who I actually like a lot, went on to get kicked out of one of our armed services for smoking Mary Jane while on duty, or so they said. But he did not lose his status as honorary Southern Colonel. :)

They only time I pull rank today is when I am being hoisted on my own petard by a group of disgruntled conservatives over some comment I've made, or some action I have undertaken. Like defending a poor, helpless crippled man or something like that; which seems to enrage some conservatives; especially the Tea Party types.  :)

I would say that is pretty much how every chosen young man becomes a genuine, honorary Southern Colonel. By doing very little of anything other than opening his mail.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

18 November 2012
Y'all have maybe come to think that I should be able to opine with authority on subtle nuances of vocabulary, when my real forte is more along the lines of One Word, One Spelling. It's true, different branches of my family tree are known by their regionalisms - such as "wheppin" and "sammich" - but those distinctions devolve for the most part into pronunciation choices and when it gets right down to my having to choose which branch of the family tree I will be identified with by how I pronounce a word, I choose not to.

"Spell is it ok to call a rifle, a pistol, a revolver and a shotgun, or even my new Elephant gun, just a gun, or not?" So long as your audience knows, already, by the context, that you're speaking of your rifle, pistol, revolver, shotgun or Elephant [cap?] gun, you're good to go, where I come from. It's all about your audience. In a different context, however, you might want to be careful.

PollyAdler (talk|edits) said:

18 November 2012
An Immortal with a life time appointment to the French Academy can afford to equivocate. Well, it's too late now for me to withdraw the nomination. What have I wrought?

See everyone after a few weeks vacation, y'all.

MP-JD-LLM (talk|edits) said:

18 November 2012
Polly, it will be intersting to see if Crow, Gazoo or Fr. Mac post anything in your absence.

Fr. Mackelhenry (talk|edits) said:

19 November 2012
That's my greatest fear. That one of these characters might actually take up a life of his own, and become incarnate.

Take care all. I hope that your God (the God of us all, even of the low down atheists) layeth out a table before thine enemies this Thanksgiving, and that he comforts you with his rod and his staff and all the rest of it.

Bottom Line (talk|edits) said:

19 November 2012
I like my S&W Bodyguard. It's a little 38 special & super light. I call it "my little friend"!

MP-JD-LLM (talk|edits) said:

19 November 2012
Bottom Line, I thought about the Bodyguard. I haven't fired one, but I dislike double action semis. That long trigger pull forces me off target. With most single action semis, including my XD40, I can put six rounds inside a playing card at 7 to 10 yards. I don't mind too much if the first round is double action and then switches to single. In some weapons, e.g. the SR22, and the Colt 1911, you can cock the hammer on the first round to make it single action, and each subsequent round is single action. However, the Bodyguard, like the LC9 remains double action through each round.

Reviews of the Bodyguard mention that you can see the laser drift off target as you pull that long trigger. The trigger pull is rated at 6.5 pounds which is moderately heavy. How is yours at the range?

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

19 November 2012
"my little friend"!

Lordy, that comment had me feeling like a 16 year old teenager there for a minute. BL, you are too much. The women of this world always have a way with words.

I figure I'll be so skeered if I ever have to pull the trigger on a real evildoer that the adrenaline in my body will lighten the pull of any DA only.

Don't worry about a little gun, BL. I like to get close when I shoot also. I don't want to shoot a perp. from too far away, because then the judge might say I could have run first.

Most perps are going to attack me up close, they will get the jump on me, and I'll just do my best to blast away with what I've got if need be.

I own two handguns now. A Colt .380 pistol which I bought primarily because it was cute, and a Taurus 22LR 9 shot revolver with a long barrel. It looks longer than a 4 inch, so I guess it's a six inch. It's SA/DA, and it has the flavor of a target gun. I've gotten a lot of comments on this gun since I've owned it. And I generally load it with Stingers.

Now both the 380 Colt and the 22 six inch are sort of impractical defensive weapons (useless) in the modern world we live in, but that's just me. I ended up with these two and they are mine.

At one time I had an early production Glock 17 (9mm) with a 15 round magazine. I think it was 15. I sold the gun to a former employee of mine because for some reason I always flinched when I used it. I didn't get along with the Glock.

I'm older now and I don't go out to party much after 11:00PM any more. I avoid a lot of riff-raff this way. I spend a lot of time on the homestead and I protect my wife and my goats with a Mossberg 12 gauge pump shotgun. I'm blind as a bat without my glasses and it improves my ability to take out a target even with my glasses off.

I have been known to load it with rock salt, but the fellow who used to make me my special rock salt shells has now got Alzheimers.

I've got more shotguns that my dad left me, nice little 410 and a 10 gauge. I had a 22 Marlin rifle (first gun) that you shoot like you see the Rifleman do on TV. Lever action. I'm sure my dad bought it used, but I sold it some years ago, and I sure wish I had it back now.

My dad also left me a 30/30 which my cousin (the great white hunter) borrowed from me more than 20 years ago, and he's never returned it. I've never asked for it. So be it. It would probably collect dust in my closet. I can't remember the brand right off.

Good luck everyone. Stay safe. Don't go off half cocked. And don't go off looking for bear, because you will find him, and you will regret it.

PollyAdler (talk|edits) said:

19 November 2012
Bottom Line, I don't know if you are married or not, but if you are then buy your husband some Hoppes 9 this Christmas. It makes a super sexy cologne.

It's a little dangerous though, so I wouldn't ask him to wear it more than once or twice a year.

"My Little Friend" You are bad. Luv it.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

19 November 2012
Men, listen up. This is what I do. Tear a cotton ball in half, and soak it just a bit in Hoppes 9.

Then stick it in the pocket of a wool shirt, like a Pendleton's shirt. The solvent won't hurt a wool shirt. Don't smoke though.

I'll do this sometimes before I go to the truck stop to eat breakfast and the waitresses go gaga over it. They give me biggie everything.

Don't ever put it in the pocket of a Rayon shirt, though. It might flame up on you. $20.00 for a quart of the stuff beats any French cologne, you watch, the ladies love it. I am not kidding.

I'd hate to think what Brad Pitt could get away with while wearing this stuff, and it would certainly improve young Beiber's image.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

19 November 2012
Buffett, Petraeus, Bernanke, Bieber...

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

19 November 2012
Buffett, Petraeus, Bernanke, Bieber..., Check

Bottom Line (talk|edits) said:

19 November 2012
"My little friend" has a pretty strong pull but haven't had any problem with laser drift at the range. Using it at the 7 yard target and it's pretty accurate. I'm working on my hand strength to get more accurate. After about 50 rounds it does start to rub a blister on the webbing between my thumb and index finger so I got a golf glove to wear at the range. It's my carry and fits nicely in my concealed-carry purse. Some people complain that it has so much kick that it's not a pleasure to shoot more than around 100 rounds. I can understand this but it was designed for protection instead of target practice.

Gazoo (talk|edits) said:

20 November 2012
There are many things you can enjoy about shooting. Going out to the range and so on. But I will say this as a man BL: guns are like purses and shoes, you can never have too many of them.

That's right, even us men like to have a fashion gun or two, and that's what it is: a fashion gun. Engraved and I don't know what not. Powerful. Trophy type weapon like my elephant gun. Once you get one gun, you'll decide that it's not perfect and you'll want another one, and it keeps on like that until you go to heaven.  :)

Just remember that criminals have jobs just like the rest of us do. They go to work every day. They are the hunters, and we are the prey, and that is exactly how they look at it. We are worried about getting home with the groceries, and at the exact same time the criminal is interested in getting home with our money.

Therefore, they will almost always get the jump on the law abiding citizen. Most experienced muggers will not ask you for your money, they will come up beside you and knock you to the ground first and then take your money. (Or they will ask for directions, and then while you're talking, they'll knock you to the ground.) They want to daze you. A dazed citizen does not remember faces.

I suggest you do what I always do: go through the drive-thru window. Everywhere! Just never get out of the car. If someone tries to wash your windows, step on the gas! Stay in the house after 11pm.

I like to fool around with my guns, play at the range once and a blue moon, but I have no illusion that my gun will save me if the criminal ever gets the jump on me. If it does, fine, but I'm not betting the farm on it.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

20 November 2012
I left my weapons with the army. I weren't 'alf bad as a marksman but I never developed an obsession for them - in fact I would be fine with never holding a rifle again so long as I live. I do however appreciate some hand to hand combat but I'm getting older so unless the situation dictates otherwise, running and hiding is my preferred game plan.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

20 November 2012
obsession

You put your finger on it UK. It's an obsession sweeping the nation. These obsessions finally end in silliness; it seems to be a mathematical law.

Yes, I did spend five years trying to track down a genuine safari-used Elephant gun. I specified it must have been used in the past to bag an elephant. I wanted it muzzle loaded if I could get one (never could find one, ended production in 1890).

I ended up with one of the old Asa Candler guns. When I opened the breech on it, an elephant tooth and a few elephant whiskers fell out of it and tumbled onto the floor. That man got close to his elephant before he got his kill, boy, let me tell you.

This was a battle tested gun, and it was gummed up with body parts to prove it.

I'll tell any father here at Taxalmanac, if you want to bring your boy up right, call down to Westview Cemetary in Atlanta and see if old man Asa Candler's wild game trophy room is still open to the public. If it's open take your son and---GO!

The cemetary sits on land that was once owned by Mr. Candler, and one of his mansions sits in the middle of this site. It was donated to the cemetary as well.

When I was just a kid my father took me over there to the mansion and we were walking around exploring and he said---now lets go in this room. Ruh, roh. I was already a little bit scared because the mansion was dark, cold, gloomy and ... spooky.

He opened the thick door and we walked into this huge old panelled den-like room which was Asa Candler's African trophy room. It was just my father and me. The door closed behind us. It was quiet. Deadly quiet.

Everywhere I looked there was a pair of eyes looking back at me. You couldn't rest your eyes anywhere. I put my hand down to steady myself...and I pulled back in shock when I realized my hand was resting on a gnarly crocodile tongue. Lions, tigers and bears everywhere you looked. And there above the great, stone fireplace...tusks thrust up into the air was the undisputed king of the trophy room, the Great Bull Elephant.

I was in a room haunted by the souls of the hunted. These animal friends of old. lovingly embalmed, dusted daily; resting here just for the likes of me or any other kid who wanted to enjoy it.

Well, I ended up having to lay down across a stuffed mother leopard and her cubs to catch my breath and recover.

Candler had killed just about every animal in the world, and you need to go and see this room because a lot of the animals aren't around any more. If a kid wants to know what an old animal looked like, then he needs to go to this room.

In the ranch business, they say Big Hat, No Cattle. In the gun business, they say where there's a big gun, there's a mouse behind the trigger. Well I've got my big Elephant gun now, but I don't have the heart to kill an elephant. I feel so sorry for the elephants, I don't think I'd even use a cattle prod and a bull hook to get one out of my yard if one showed up there.

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

20 November 2012
Candler or Chandler?

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

20 November 2012
Candler, candler. That's it. I was looking for Candler. Thank you, Kevin.

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

20 November 2012
Chandler was the other spinner of tall tales via Uncle Remus. Both were big Atlanta celebs.

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

20 November 2012
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eoEojphw7kk

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

20 November 2012
Right, I've used him this week here too. I mentioned somewhere that if I were called up to duty as Southern colonel of my state, I'd play the clever fool like B'rer Rabbit did.

Kevin, I made another change up there too. Heh heh. I changed "Uh oh" to "Ruh, roh" (a la Scooby). I'm on a roll today. Freebasing youtube will do wonders for you.

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

20 November 2012
Oh I am the King of youtube links!

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

20 November 2012
What's great is to just go to youtube and get lost in it. Free associate. It's amazing. It's one of the few things about the internet that I really enjoy. You never know what you'll learn, or what old memory will be stirred up and re-activated. Of course, you have your duds too, but that only serves to remind you that it's time for a snack.

I want to thank Ukbones for helping me to remember the old African trophy room I visited when I was young, and I think I am beginning to see the reason he won't eat meat.

Bottom Line (talk|edits) said:

25 November 2012
Looking forward to Tampa's gun show next weekend. I've got to get a couple of my Dad's old guns looked at by a gunsmith and hope to add them to my shooting collection: 1911 he carried during WWII and a 22 rifle he got for his 10th birthday in 1930.

Gazoo-trust me. I've gotten even more careful of where I go and when since I started carrying. I don't stay at my office building after dark and if it's after 5:30, I get the security guard to escort me. There's a homeless camp in the woods behind the building and they panhandle in the parking lot.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

25 November 2012
BL, If you hurry, you can get a bottle of that Dirty Rose perfume and I suggested as your Christmas gift (see other post).

DSH website given on the Eureka gift post. It's the perfect perfume for a lady gun-slinger. No one else will have it. It' will make the other ladies shootin' mad and green with envy to know that you got it first.

Remember, in America, every new hobby is an excuse for a smashing new fashion statement.

I'll also need to put down in my memo book to avoid the area around Tampa's gun show. I'd hate to say the wrong thing around that crowd.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

25 November 2012
Also, Bottom Line, you might want to look into buying a used Taurus 22 caliber revolver. Mine is listed for 22LR. It's stamped on the barrel.

My Taurus revolver has a 10cm barrel exactly (I measured it today) which is about 4 1/16 inches I'd say. You can feed it all day long with cheap ammunition, and it's very easy to keep clean. The barrel is actually shorter than I thought it was.

It's great for plinking or target shooting. Then, when you get it home, load it with CCI Stinger 22 LR for potential self defense use. It would not be your first line gun for self defense, but why not have a back up?

Here is a guy shooting Stingers in his 22 rifle. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DU7pQebMJPk

The Taurus are actually a pretty heavy gun, so I don't worry about the Stingers hurting the gun, and I reserve the CCI ammo. for potential self-defense use only (not used to plink or target shoot with).

Everyone needs a 22 in their "arsenal" because they are cheap to keep fed. I also note from youtube that CCI appears to make a hollow point Stinger now as an option. I would not recommend the hollow point option in 22 calibre, and I think it would actually be a less effective self defense round in a 22. If the 22 bullet kills, it would kill by penetration, not expansion and hydro-static shock in my opinion.

I understand that guns kill and all that, but by God they are fun to talk about. It's almost worth taking a round for the team just to be able to sit around and talk about our guns. Of course, it's nice to have a doctor on the team too.

Also, I completely agree with you about gloves. I believe that people should wear gloves every day. Some of the shooting gloves are elegant. I'd personally love to find a pair of light grey leather or kid skin gloves to wear around town like the gentlemen did in the old days.

The old timers of the professional class wore gloves because life was dirty back then. It was dirty just to go out about town. Well, the germs are back, and we'd all be better off today if we left our germs on the outside of an elegant pair of gloves instead of getting the germs on our bare hands the way we do.

Also, gloves can protect your hands against age spots or other damage from the sun so your grandkids don't run away from you when you extend a hand to them.

Ciao everyone.

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