Discussion:Bad Advice!

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Discussion Forum Index --> Basic Tax Questions --> Bad Advice!


Discussion Forum Index --> Tax Questions --> Bad Advice!

Mshelden (talk|edits) said:

February 15, 2013
I am flabbergasted! It is no wonder our clients ask us crazy questions when there's advice like this on the EHow forums:

EHow article by Kevin Johnston

Tell me I'm not crazy! This is all wrong, there's no way to write off a new roof! If you're talking about a rental house, that's a different story, but that's not what this guy is talking about

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
what a crock of bull

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
Please, everyone post a comment at the bottom of the article about how people should seek advice from a tax professional, and not trust free info off of the internet.

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
Thanks, Fred, and Margaret!

Mshelden (talk|edits) said:

February 15, 2013
There were a few other articles related to it that told how you can do things like deduct interest on a home loan used for repairs, or add to the basis of your home when you sell it. OK. But this article was just so different, we were thinking, What have we missed?!

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
It makes you wonder how much other bad advice this guy gives. Something that can easily be looked up he doesn't even bother to research. And the dope who posts this on the internet without double checking. Ameriprise Financial. HA!

Pegatha (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
"Kevin Johnston writes for Ameriprise Financial and Rant Finance. He has written about business, marketing, finance, sales and investing for publications such as "The New York Daily News," "Business Age" and "Nation's Business." He is an instructional designer with credits for companies such as ADP and Bank of America."

What the hell is an "instructional designer"?

Pegatha (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
I like how the related article "Can I Deduct the Cost of Re-Roofing My Home From My Federal Income Tax?" completely contradicts the first one.

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
I think that's someone who develops the outline for an education course. He doesn't teach it, he doesn't write it, he writes the outline.

Captcook (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
That's not bad advice...it's straight fiction.

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
Kevin Johnston has also written this gem:

"Multiply the remaining figure by your tax bracket percentage. The percentages are listed after the worksheet on form 1040 ES. Your net income after expenses and tax credits times your tax percentage is your annual income tax." [emphasis added...]

Sorta disappoints me not to be able to address him directly. Yes, he's dangerous.

Tonymontana (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
This stuff must be true, because they can't post anything on the internet that's not true.

Right?

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
Bon jour, mais oui. <<French model>>

MP-JD-LLM (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
OK, the advice is a bit ambiguous from the headnote. However, if you drill down into the article, you will find that the author says that a new roof increases the tax basis of the home which reduces the gain upon sale. Thus, the new roof is "deductible." I see nothing wrong with this.

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
You're reading the wrong article, MP.

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
Is a Roof Replaced on a Home Tax Deductible?

By Kevin Johnston, eHow Contributor

Pegoo (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
Sure print out that article and when the IRS says no, you sue lol. Wait till you guys here what WFG tell their sheepo about tax deductions when working as a agent for them.

Zokan (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
Good advice and you can free file from the same page, now that's convenience! I'm off to vacuum my carpet, thus "prolonging my home's useful life" - another deduction!

Looks like they deleted a few of the replies.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
[[Bon jour, mais oui. <<French model>>]] K5, I am surprised no one has commented on this post. That commercial, which we must agree is pretty corny, causes my wife to laugh (a lot) every time she sees it, and she sees it a lot. She is otherwise very normal  :-)

As to the article, I know IRS claims to be shorthanded, but I wonder if they either see and act on these types of things, or would do so if someone brought them to their attention. By "act on", I don't mean serious stuff - just requesting corrections, withdrawals, or clarifications.

Southparkcpa (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2013
I also see errors on the ask.com forum. CPAs give advice for a small fee. Half those answers are as bad as this web site.

Taxaway (talk|edits) said:

16 February 2013
And unfortunately there are those taxpayers who will cherrypick for their answers, finding ones that suit their desire to deduct something not allowed or simply ridiculous. Often those taxpayers then attempt to waste our time arguing with us. I have no problem educating clients who are misinformed; it's the ones who think grasping onto an incompetent's opinion gives it validation.

CathysTaxes (talk|edits) said:

16 February 2013
You can't fix stupid.

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

16 February 2013
You can edit it, tho.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

16 February 2013
"And unfortunately there are those taxpayers who will cherrypick for their answers"

Like the people who call IRS a number of times and rephrase their question until they get the answer they want.

Southparkcpa (talk|edits) said:

16 February 2013
And unfortunately there are those taxpayers who will cherrypick for their answers"

When the Treasury secretary does it...what do we expect of our citizens?

DonPriebe (talk|edits) said:

17 February 2013
From one of his linked stories: Be cautious about being audited buy the IRS for projects that could be construed as repairs.

Does he ...

  a) need a grammer checker to replace 'buy' with 'by'
  b) need a punctuation checker to put a period after the word 'audited' and change 'buy' to 'Buy'

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

17 February 2013
Here are the comments on Mr. Johnston's article as of this morning:

If this wasn't so grossly incorrect, it would be laughable. However, it is not funny because some poor unsuspecting taxpayer might follow this total flawed concept. Folks, Its NOT deductible!

Please file this article in the fiction section.

A great example of why you shouldn't believe everything you read on the Internet. Hire a competent professional!

This article should be disregarded in full as the author is in gross error.

Bad bad bad advice.

Wow, this looks like the Turbo Tax commercial where the plumber was doing taxes the week before. Hey, Mr. EHow, how about you let us do the taxes and you stick to building roofs. If not rental, or a home office, or medical in nature, no deduction. But again, anyone who wishes to have a carpenter do their taxes, go to town.

This article is complete crap. The only way it's indirectly possible to deduct improvements to your residence (a rental house or business property is a completely different matter, but this article seems to be specifically about your personal residence), is that if you are improving your house, rather than merely maintaining it, you can add the cost of the improvement to your cost basis, and reduce potential gain when you sell it. But most people can exclude the full gain on the sale of their residence anyways, so a moot point. Please see a tax professional who knows the details of your situation before trying to deduct something like this.

What a bunch of nonsense! PLEASE do not take the advice of a handyman regarding your taxes. Get qualified, experience, professional help. A roof to your residence is NOT deductible.

>> I had left a comment earlier, but eHow removed it. Perhaps I was too harsh. But I sure didn't think so...

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

17 February 2013
"This article should be disregarded in full as the author is in gross error."

Where is 'gross error?' Is it near Chicago?

Deback (talk|edits) said:

February 17, 2013
It came from Chicago, but now it's in Washington, DC. We've been told it originated in Hawaii.

Fsteincpa (talk|edits) said:

17 February 2013
Wow, that is odd Harry, I saw yours when you first posted, but now it is removed. Interesting.

Tax Writer (talk|edits) said:

18 February 2013
This article is really, really bad. I don't have a Facebook page, otherwise I'd leave a comment, too.

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

18 February 2013
But Wait!! There's More!!

Kevin Johnston also weighs in on when and how interest is paid by the IRS on tax refunds. Check this out:

"Interest Due on a Refund

"The Internal Revenue Service pays interest on any money it holds in excess payments from you if your refund is more than 10 percent of your payable tax. ... Once your refund has been processed, you do not accumulate any more interest, even if you have not yet been issued a check."

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

18 February 2013
where does that idiot get his info??!?!?

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

18 February 2013
http://www.ehow.com/info_12036704_tax-consequences-interest-earned-overpayment-refund.html

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

18 February 2013
Estimated taxes? why, 30% should do it. Another Kevin Johnston article: http://www.ehow.com/how_10067813_set-up-quarterly-estimated-tax-deduction-account.html

Taxea (talk|edits) said:

19 February 2013
I would love to comment on the site but I refuse to use social sites. I am going to google him and send him an email.

I think we all should do that. Look on the bright side, the lemonade from this lemon is we now all know who the TP is talking about when they say "Someone told me" blah, blah, blah....When I find it I will post it.....okay Trillium?????

Fsteincpa (talk|edits) said:

19 February 2013
I get a lot of referral from my facebook page. You can ignore social media, but it's here to stay. I tried googling him to do the same, send an email. Didn't have much luck, but then again, I suck at the yellow box as well.

I was also hoping to find an email for e-how, we should all draft a letter and tell them this guy is a complete friggin idiot, who theoretically could create a lawsuit for the e-zine.

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